Savor-ed, Part Deux

5 Jun
 
Savor provides a Buddhist perspective and training toward things thwarting our health in the U.S.  – and elsewhere in the world where overweight and obesity-related health problems exist – now referred to as “obesigenic societies”.

Savor uses the principles of mindfulness, best defined as “non-judgmental, present-oriented focused attention”. 

I highly recommend Savor as a read for the summer – take it a chapter at a time once you hit Part II of the book and reflect on how you can incorporate its practices into your life.

Part I: A Buddhist Perspective on Weight Control
 
What I love about this part is that unlike diet plans addressing the problems this section of Savor asks you to reflect on the psychosocial, environmental and cultural factors that often act as barriers in changing behaviors. Everything in life is interrelated and to negate parts of your life can result in failure to fully make the changes. Becoming more aware of your body and mind through breath and meditation can result in making sustainable behavior change. Fundamental Buddhist teachings are outlined – the Four Foundations of Mindfulness (being in connection with your body, your feelings, your mind and the objects of your mind).

Also – it outlines the importance of making a mission statement when making a change. Writing down the intended result helps to keep us on our path, whether it is weight loss or anything else in life.

Make your mission statement! Below is a sample. I’m working on one for myself (not weight loss, per se, but being active goals) and will be happy to share when it’s ready for review:

Remember to revise your mission statements – keep changing them once you’ve reached your goal.

In the interest of keeping posts short, I’m going to SAV-or Parts II (“Mindful Action Plans”) and III (“Individual and Collective Effort”) for posts this week. See them all back to back by using the “read” tag feature in the posts.




 

  
References for the definition of mindfulness: Kabat-Zinn, 2003
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